RGU CompSoc

Robert Gordon University Computer Society

Get Going with the Raspberry Pi & Clusters

Around this time last year (16th Oct 2012) RGU CompSoc hosted a lecture/workshop given by a final year student who was looking at the Raspberry Pi as part of his Honours Project. Given that we are planning to explore the Raspberry Pi again this year, here are some resources that may be useful.

The MagPi – a monthly magazine has loads of projects and ideas to try out.

The MagPi : Issue 17 – Oct 2013 (online page | pdf) – Robotics with BrickPi

The MagPi : Issue 16 – Sept 2013 (online page | pdf) – USB Arduino link, Bash, Java XML and more

The MagPi : Issue 15 – Aug 2013 (online page | pdf) – Old-school gaming

The MagPi : Issue 14 – July 2013 (online page | pdf) – The camera module

The MagPi : Issue 13 – June 2013 (online page | pdf) – C & Fortran, Parallel Computations

The MagPi : Issue 12 – May 2013 (online page | pdf) – A Year of the MagPi

The MagPi : Issue 11 – April 2013 (online page | pdf) – Minecraft Pi Edition – Install, Play and Program

Raspberry Pi as a Media Center (pdf)

Raspberry Pi Getting Started Guide (pdf)

Raspberry Pi Education Manual (pdf)

The video below released just a year ago (15th Oct 2012) shows the construction of a parallel computer by making use of 64 Raspberry Pi’s. To-date it has received almost half a million views. Closer to home, you will see that the University of Glasgow has assembled four Lego Racks each with 14 Raspberry Pi’s, giving a total of 56 nodes, the project is known as (raspberrypicloud).

Another interesting video released just a month a go shows the process of how the Raspberry Pi’s are actually made.

The video below (24 Oct 2012) shows how you can make use of a Raspberry Pi as a full desktop machine making use of lots of USB devices.

A nice example of a Beowulf cluster can be seen in the next video, detailing a 32/33 node cluster built as part of a students dissertation work. One can read more about this system from a post at (hackaday.com). One can read a 17 page (pdf) outlining the system, which also include some performance data and images of the cluster.

A couple of students in school (http://wtcs.ca) built a three node Raspberry Pi Supercomputer (13 April 2013). As you can see the video gives a nice overview of the classic parallel computing system – MPI – the Message Passing Interface.

They have also put together a 64 node machine, as can be seen in the video below (15th June 2013) which gives a nice short overview of the networking infrastructure they have used to support the cluster.

Other Articles on Raspberry Pi Clusters
Another nice example of a Raspberry Pi Cluster can be seen at (www.lab7.io).
An example of a Cluster Rack for the Pi created from Lego Mindstorm NXT parts can be seen at (www.huntrods.com).
A 5 node cluster making use of Lego for its Rack infrastructure (blogs.nvidia.com)
A short article on (www.zdnet.com) about the 56 node Glasgow Pi Cluster.
An 8 node Raspberry Pi Mini Cluster (www.ichec.ie) Irish Centre for High-End Computing.
A 10 node cluster developed as part of a final year project (www.softwareontheside.info).
A 95 page project report (pdf) on the setup and testing of an 8 node cluster consisting of 6 Pandaboard ES boards, 2 Raspberry Pi boards, with an intel dual-core machine being used as the head node.

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